Private Lessons by Cynthia Salaysay

Disclaimer: I received this e-arc from the publisher and netgalley. Thanks! All opinions are my own.

 

Book: Private Lessons

 

Author: Cynthia Salaysay

 

Book Series: Standalone

 

Rating: 5/5

 

Diversity: Filipino American main character!

 

Publication Date: May 12, 2020

 

Genre: YA Contemporary

 

Recommended Age: 18+ (sex and sexual content, statutory rape TW, underage drinking, death, child grooming, drug use, abuse: emotional mental verbal and psychological, racism, language, self-harm TW, depression, gaslighting, wanting to kill a character more than Umbridge)

 

Publisher: Candlewick Press

 

Pages: 320

 

Amazon Link

 

Synopsis: After seventeen-year-old Claire Alalay’s father’s death, only music has helped her channel her grief. Claire likes herself best when she plays his old piano, a welcome escape from the sadness — and her traditional Filipino mother’s prayer groups. In the hopes of earning a college scholarship, Claire auditions for Paul Avon, a prominent piano teacher, who agrees to take Claire as a pupil. Soon Claire loses herself in Paul’s world and his way of digging into a composition’s emotional core. She practices constantly, foregoing a social life, but no matter how hard she works or how well she plays, it seems impossible to gain Paul’s approval, let alone his affection.

Author Cynthia Salaysay composes a moving, beautifully written portrait of rigorous perfectionism, sexual awakening, and the challenges of self-acceptance. Timely and vital, Private Lessons delves into a complicated student/teacher relationship, as well as class and cultural differences, with honesty and grace.

 

Review: This was a gorgeous book! The book does not shy from the tough points, where it shows our main character who is in love with this (for a lack of a better word) pedo who is abusing his authority to have sex with her (a minor, EW!). The book is expertly written, amazingly well detailed for world building, and the characters are engaging (and disgusting in Paul’s case). Sometimes when books say they are wrote for a certain thing (like feminism or otherwise) I find the book isn’t really embodying that movement. However, I feel like this book is a champion for the #metoo movement.

 

However, I felt like the book was a bit slower paced than what I usually preferred, but I think it’s intention. It makes you pause and forces you to hear Claire’s story, through the good, the bad, and the ugly.

 

Verdict: I recommend this as essential reading. It’s hard to read sometimes, but it’s essential to do so.

Breath Like Water by Anna Jarzab

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Disclaimer: I received this e-arc from the publisher and netgalley. Thanks! All opinions are my own.

Book: Breath Like Water

Author: Anna Jarzab

Book Series: Standalone

Rating: 5/5

Diversity: bipolar disorder openly discussed!

Publication Date: May 19, 2020

Genre: YA Contemporary

Recommended Age: 15+ (verbal abuse, competitive swimming, mental health, language)

Publisher: Inkyard Press

Pages: 416

Amazon Link

Synopsis: Susannah Ramos has always loved the water. A swimmer whose early talent made her a world champion, Susannah was poised for greatness in a sport that demands so much of its young. But an inexplicable slowdown has put her dream in jeopardy, and Susannah is fighting to keep her career afloat when two important people enter her life: a new coach with a revolutionary training strategy, and a charming fellow swimmer named Harry Matthews.

As Susannah begins her long and painful climb back to the top, her friendship with Harry blossoms into passionate and supportive love. But Harry is facing challenges of his own, and even as their bond draws them closer together, other forces work to tear them apart. As she struggles to balance her needs with those of the people who matter most to her, Susannah will learn the cost—and the beauty—of trying to achieve something extraordinary.

Review: This was such a sweet book! I really loved the character development, the story, and the world building. I never knew how competitive swimming could be, as I grew up in a rural school with no swimming teams. The characters were the lifeline of the story. They really made the story progress and enjoyable. The storyline was intriguing, and the detail the author incorporated was amazing.

The only issue I had with the book is that the pacing was slow in my opinion. I just wish it was a bit faster.

Verdict: It was a great read!

Breath Like Water

Anna Jarzab
On Sale Date: May 19, 2020
9781335050236, 133505023X
Hardcover
$18.99 USD, $23.99 CAD
Young Adult Fiction / Sports & Recreation / Water Sports
Ages 13 And Up
416 pages

ABOUT THE BOOK:
This beautifully lyrical contemporary novel features an elite teen swimmer with Olympic dreams, plagued by injury and startled by unexpected romance, who struggles to balance training with family and having a life. For fans of Sarah Dessen, Julie Murphy and Miranda Kenneally.

Susannah Ramos has always loved the water. A swimmer whose early talent made her a world champion, Susannah was poised for greatness in a sport that demands so much of its young. But an inexplicable slowdown has put her Olympic dream in jeopardy, and Susannah is fighting to keep her career afloat when two important people enter her life: a new coach with a revolutionary training strategy, and a charming fellow swimmer named Harry Matthews.

As Susannah begins her long and painful climb back to the top, her friendship with Harry blossoms into passionate and supportive love. But Harry is facing challenges of his own, and even as their bond draws them closer together, other forces work to tear them apart. As she struggles to balance her needs with those of the people who matter most to her, Susannah will learn the cost–and the beauty–of trying to achieve something extraordinary.

anna_jarzab_photo credit Marisa Emralino

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Anna Jarzab is a Midwesterner turned New Yorker. She lives and works in New York City and is the author of such books as Red Dirt, All Unquiet Things, The Opposite of Hallelujah, and the Many-Worlds series. Visit her online at annajarzab.com and on Twitter, @ajarzab.

BUY LINKS:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Indie Bound
Google Play
Apple Books

SOCIAL LINKS:
Instagram: @ajarzab
Twitter: @ajarzab
Author website: https://www.annajarzab.com/

Everything’s Not Fine by Sarah J. Carlson

BANNER (1)

Disclaimer: I received this e-book from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own.

Book: Everything’s Not Fine

Author: Sarah Carlson

Book Series: Standalone

Rating: 5/5

Publication Date: May 26, 2020

Genre: YA Contemporary

Recommended Age: 16+ (drug use, addiction, near death)

Publisher: Turner

Pages: 304

Amazon Link

Synopsis: Seventeen-year-old Rose Hemmersbach aspires to break out of small town Sparta, Wisconsin and achieve her artistic dreams at Belwyn School for the Arts after she graduates. Painting is Rose’s escape from her annoying younger siblings and her family’s one rule: ignore the elephant in the room, because talking about it makes it real. That is, until the day Rose finds her mother dying on the kitchen floor of a heroin overdose. Kneeling beside her, Rose pleads with the universe to find a heartbeat. She does – but when her mother is taken to the hospital, the troubles are just beginning. Rose and her dad are left to pick up the pieces. Now all that matters are her siblings. Rose doesn’t have room to do her schoolwork, let alone pick up a paintbrush. Until Rose is forced to do the homecoming mural with Rafa, a new senior at Sparta High. Rose and Rafa don’t have an ounce of school spirit between them, but Rose discovers her brain still has room to paint. As Rose fights to hold everything together, and her dreams of the future start to slip from her grasp, she must face the question of what happens when – if – her mom comes home again. And if, deep down, if Rose even wants her to.

Review: What I think really will stick with me about this book is that this book wasn’t afraid to show the rawness about how drug abuse and addiction really is, much like Ellen Hopkins poetic books do. The book showed the before, the during, and the after and it did so without backing down. The book had amazing characters who were all wonderfully developed and the world building was marvelous. I really liked this book and I think the book can help kids and adults alike.

The only issue I had with the book was that I felt that the book was a bit too happy in the end and that the book had a slow pace.

Verdict: Worth the read!

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Camp by Lev A.C. Rosen

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Disclaimer: I received this e-arc from the publisher and netgalley. Thanks! All opinions are my own.

 

Book: Camp

 

Author: Lev A.C. Rosen

 

Book Series: Standalone

 

Rating: 4/5

 

Diversity: LGBT friendly! Gay, demi, trans, lesbian, non-bininary, Korean, Jewish, Middle Eastern, Black Brazillian, Black, etc.

 

Publication Date: May 26, 2020

 

Genre: YA Contemporary

 

Recommended Age: 16+ (sexual content, mental health, toxic masculinity)

 

Publisher: Little Brown Books for Young Readers

 

Pages: 384

 

Amazon Link

 

Synopsis:  Sixteen-year-old Randy Kapplehoff loves spending the summer at Camp Outland, a camp for queer teens. It’s where he met his best friends. It’s where he takes to the stage in the big musical. And it’s where he fell for Hudson Aaronson-Lim – who’s only into straight-acting guys and barely knows not-at-all-straight-acting Randy even exists.

This year, though, it’s going to be different. Randy has reinvented himself as ‘Del’ – buff, masculine, and on the market. Even if it means giving up show tunes, nail polish, and his unicorn bedsheets, he’s determined to get Hudson to fall for him.

But as he and Hudson grow closer, Randy has to ask himself how much is he willing to change for love. And is it really love anyway, if Hudson doesn’t know who he truly is?

 

Review: I was definitely worried about the book based on the blurb, but after reading it I thought it was handled excellently and the book was pretty good! The book had well developed characters with well done world building. The book also tackled the tough topics well and was very sex-positive!

 

My only issue is that the books pacing waned here and there. It was slow in a lot of places and it really took a bit for the book to pick up in my opinion.

 

Verdict: Definitely recommend!

BOOK INFORMATION

Camp

by Lev A.C. Rosen
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Release Date: May 26th 2020

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary, LGBT, Queer

 

Synopsis:

 

From the author of the acclaimed Jack of Hearts (and other parts) comes a sweet and sharp screwball comedy that critiques the culture of toxic masculinity within the queer community.

 

Sixteen-year-old Randy Kapplehoff loves spending the summer at Camp Outland, a camp for queer teens. It’s where he met his best friends. It’s where he takes to the stage in the big musical. And it’s where he fell for Hudson Aaronson-Lim – who’s only into straight-acting guys and barely knows not-at-all-straight-acting Randy even exists.

 

This year, though, it’s going to be different. Randy has reinvented himself as ‘Del’ – buff, masculine, and on the market. Even if it means giving up show tunes, nail polish, and his unicorn bedsheets, he’s determined to get Hudson to fall for him.

 

But as he and Hudson grow closer, Randy has to ask himself how much is he willing to change for love. And is it really love anyway, if Hudson doesn’t know who he truly is?

 

BOOK LINKS

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48081823-camp

Amazon: https://amzn.to/2xTMIj7

Bookdepository: https://www.bookdepository.com/Camp-L-C-Rosen/9780241428252?ref=grid-view&qid=1584822573045&sr=1-1

iTunes: https://books.apple.com/gb/book/camp/id1479840904

B&N: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/camp-l-c-rosen/1133331865?ean=9780316537759

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/ebook/camp-22

Google Books: https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Camp.html?id=LQ6vDwAAQBAJ&redir_esc=y

 

 

author (14)

 

AUTHOR INFORMATION

Lev Rosen is the author of books for all ages. Two for adults: All Men of Genius (Amazon Best of the Month, Audie Award Finalist) and Depth (Amazon Best of the Year, Shamus Award Finalist, Kirkus Best Science Fiction for April). Two middle-grade books: Woundabout (illustrated by his brother, Ellis Rosen), and The Memory Wall. His first Young Adult Novel, Jack of Hearts (and other parts) was an American Library Association Rainbow List Top 10 of 2018. His books have been sold around the world and translated into different languages as well as being featured on many best of the year lists, and nominated for awards.

 

Lev is originally from lower Manhattan and now lives in even lower Manhattan, right at the edge, with his husband and very small cat. You can find him online at LevACRosen.com and @LevACRosen

 

AUTHOR LINKS

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4731557.Lev_A_C_Rosen

Website: https://www.levacrosen.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LevACRosen

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LevRosen/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/levacrosen/

 

The Life and (Medieval) Times of Kit Sweetly by Jamie Pacton for Fantastic Flying Book Club

Disclaimer: I received this arc from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own.

Book: The Life and Medieval Times of Kit Sweetly

Author: Jamie Pacton

Book Series: Standalone

Rating: 5/5

Diversity:f/f relationship, mixed race couple, bi character, non-binary character

Publication Date: May 5, 2020

Genre: YA Contemporary

Recommended Age: 16+ (underage smoking, underage drinking, drug abuse TW, child abuse TW, language)

Publisher: Page Street Kids

Pages: 384

Amazon Link

Synopsis: Working as a wench ― i.e. waitress ― at a cheesy medieval-themed restaurant in the Chicago suburbs, Kit Sweetly dreams of being a knight like her brother. She has the moves, is capable on a horse, and desperately needs the raise that comes with knighthood, so she can help her mom pay the mortgage and hold a spot at her dream college.

Company policy allows only guys to be knights. So when Kit takes her brother’s place and reveals her identity at the end of the show, she rockets into internet fame and a whole lot of trouble with the management. But the Girl Knight won’t go down without a fight. As other wenches join her quest, a protest forms. In a joust before Castle executives, they’ll prove that gender restrictions should stay medieval―if they don’t get fired first.

Moxie meets A Knight’s Tale as Kit Sweetly slays sexism, bad bosses, and bad luck to become a knight at a medieval-themed restaurant.

Review: Holy cow I absolutely love this book! It was fast paced and absolutely amazing! The writing was well done; the author was able to convey so much with showing rather than telling, especially with Alex who is a non-binary character. The characters were all well developed and I loved the back stories and world building the author wrote into this book. I expected it to be a simple story with an over-arching romance, but the main focal point was the knighthood and I really appreciated that in this novel, especially one making a point about gender norms and feminism (which argues equality for all, not just those who identify as female). I also want to brag about the romance, which is mixed race (some people are still against that in 2020, isn’t that wild?) and is very sweet. Jett doesn’t come to the rescue of Kit. While he’s a help and he definitely aides Kit and the others, he doesn’t steal the show from Kit. That’s something I don’t see a lot in YA books, from either side, and I really appreciated this change in the norm. This book is definitely one of my faves of 2020! Great job Jamie Pacton!

The only issue I would say that I had is that sometimes the time jumps were a bit disjointed. 99% of them were separated by a little icon in the book to symbolize time breaks, but there was one or two in there that wasn’t and vice versa there were one or two times where the book was separated but it was the next action right before the “time jump”. Also, there were little plot points that were kinda swept under the rug. I wish that Kit had invited Jett and Layla into her house and I kinda wish that Len didn’t have a “redeeming” arc but meh that’s life, men get all the credit -_-.

Verdict: I highly recommend this read!

This is My Brain in Love by I.W. Gregorio

Disclaimer: I received an arc from TheNovl! Thanks! All opinions are my own.

 

Book: This is My Brain in Love

 

Author: I. W. Gregorio

 

Book Series: Standalone

 

Rating: 5/5

 

Diversity: Chinese and Nigerian culture/characters!

 

Publication Date: April 14, 2020

 

Genre: YA Contemporary

 

Recommended Age: 14+ (mental health discussed, love)

 

Publisher: Little Brown Books for Young Readers

 

Pages: 384

 

Amazon Link

 

Synopsis: Jocelyn Wu has just three wishes for her junior year: To make it through without dying of boredom, to direct a short film with her BFF Priya Venkatram, and to get at least two months into the year without being compared to or confused with Peggy Chang, the only other Chinese girl in her grade.

Will Domenici has two goals: to find a paying summer internship, and to prove he has what it takes to become an editor on his school paper.

Then Jocelyn’s father tells her their family restaurant may be going under, and all wishes are off. Because her dad has the marketing skills of a dumpling, it’s up to Jocelyn and her unlikely new employee, Will, to bring A-Plus Chinese Garden into the 21st century (or, at least, to Facebook).What starts off as a rocky partnership soon grows into something more. But family prejudices and the uncertain future of A-Plus threaten to keep Will and Jocelyn apart. It will take everything they have and more, to save the family restaurant and their budding romance.

 

Review: I thought this book was very well done. The book doesn’t shy away from the tough issues faced in this book and the characters are very well developed. The plot was intriguing and I loved how the book did with the dual POV. It was such a cute story!

 

My only issue was that the story moves fairly slowly in places.

 

Verdict: A well done contemporary!

We Didn’t Ask For This by Adi Alsaid

Disclaimer: I received this e-arc from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own.

 

Book: We Didn’t Ask for This

 

Author: Adi Alsaid

 

Book Series: Standalone

 

Rating: 4/5

 

Diversity: LGBT+ friendly

 

Publication Date: April 7, 2020

 

Genre: YA Contemporary

 

Recommended Age: 15+ (slight violence, romance)

 

Publisher: Inkyard Press

 

Pages: 352

 

Amazon Link

 

Synopsis: Every year, lock-in night changes lives. This year, it might just change the world.

Central International School’s annual lock-in is legendary — and for six students, this year’s lock-in is the answer to their dreams. The chance to finally win the contest. Kiss the guy. Make a friend. Become the star of a story that will be passed down from student to student for years to come.

But then a group of students, led by Marisa Cuevas, stage an eco-protest and chain themselves to the doors, vowing to keep everyone trapped inside until their list of demands is met. While some students rally to the cause, others are devastated as they watch their plans fall apart. And Marisa, once so certain of her goals, must now decide just how far she’ll go to attain them.

 

Review: I thought the book was pretty good. The characters were interesting and well developed. The plot itself was intriguing and kept me interested in the book throughout the whole novel. I really liked this lockdown novel during this lockdown time period.

 

However, I felt like something the pacing drug on and on and it was hard to imagine what the world looked like. There was very little world building and it got confusing at times. Also, the unbreakable windows were a bit unrealistic.

 

Verdict: It was pretty good!

The Lucky Ones by Liz Lawson

Disclaimer: I received this arc from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own.

 

Book: The Lucky Ones

 

Author: Liz Lawson

 

Book Series: Standalone

 

Rating: 5/5

 

Publication Date: April 7, 2020

 

Genre: YA Contemporary

 

Recommended Age: 15+ (discusses and depicts gun violence/school shooting TW, some delinquent behavior, romance)

 

Publisher: Delacorte Press

 

Pages: 352

 

Amazon Link

 

Synopsis: How do you put yourself back together when it seems like you’ve lost it all?

May is a survivor. But she doesn’t feel like one. She feels angry. And lost. And alone. Eleven months after the school shooting that killed her twin brother, May still doesn’t know why she was the only one to walk out of the band room that day. No one gets what she went through–no one saw and heard what she did. No one can possibly understand how it feels to be her.

Zach lost his old life when his mother decided to defend the shooter. His girlfriend dumped him, his friends bailed, and now he spends his time hanging out with his little sister…and the one faithful friend who stuck around. His best friend is needy and demanding, but he won’t let Zach disappear into himself. Which is how Zach ends up at band practice that night. The same night May goes with her best friend to audition for a new band.

Which is how May meets Zach. And how Zach meets May. And how both might figure out that surviving could be an option after all.

 

Review: I really liked this book! I think the author did well to approach the subject with grace and sensitivity. I think that the writing was well done, the characters were likeable and well developed. The pacing was also well done. I also liked how the author showed how different grief is. Grief isn’t just tears and there’s no one way to deal with it. Sometimes grief manifest itself in different ways and each person has to come up with ways to deal with it in their own way.

 

However, I did feel like the romance was a bit forced, but it felt more natural as the book went on. The book also did well with the subject of school shootings, but otherwise there wasn’t much of a story outside of how characters deal with grief, which normally doesn’t keep my attention (but in this one it did for the most part). Ultimately, it’s just saddening to think that while these characters get to heal, the process will begin all over again with new children, some of them as young as 5, until we come together as a nation to figure out a way to stop these from happening to the next group of children.

 

Verdict: A well done book that, while doesn’t present ways to prevent gun violence, helps show how we can better help those who are “the lucky ones”.

Music From Another World by Robin Talley

Disclaimer: I received this e-arc from the publisher! Thanks! All opinions are my own.

Book: Music From Another World

Author: Robin Talley

Book Series: Standalone

Rating: 4/5

Publication Date: March 31, 2020

Genre: YA Contemporary

Recommended Age: 17+ (love, some language, forced outings TW, some abusive language)

Publisher: Inkyard Press

Pages: 304

Amazon Link

Synopsis: It’s summer 1977 and closeted lesbian Tammy Larson can’t be herself anywhere. Not at her strict Christian high school, not at her conservative Orange County church and certainly not at home, where her ultrareligious aunt relentlessly organizes antigay political campaigns. Tammy’s only outlet is writing secret letters in her diary to gay civil rights activist Harvey Milk…until she’s matched with a real-life pen pal who changes everything.

Sharon Hawkins bonds with Tammy over punk music and carefully shared secrets, and soon their letters become the one place she can be honest. The rest of her life in San Francisco is full of lies. The kind she tells for others—like helping her gay brother hide the truth from their mom—and the kind she tells herself. But as antigay fervor in America reaches a frightening new pitch, Sharon and Tammy must rely on their long-distance friendship to discover their deeply personal truths, what they’ll stand for…and who they’ll rise against.

A master of award-winning queer historical fiction, New York Times bestselling author Robin Talley once again brings to life with heart and vivid detail an emotionally captivating story about the lives of two teen girls living in an age when just being yourself was an incredible act of bravery.

Review: Overall, I thought this was a good book. I loved how the story was told and I thought all of the characters were compelling. The world building was divine and overall I really enjoyed it.

The only issue is that I felt like there were multiple occurrences of forced outings, which can be triggering, and the letters and diary entries did get a bit stale after a bit.

Verdict: It’s pretty good! Definitely recommend!

The Edge of Anything by Nora Shalaway Carpenter for Fantastic Flying Book Club

TOUR BANNER (19)

Disclaimer: I received an e-arc from netgalley. Thanks! All opinions are my own.

Book: The Edge of Anything

Author: Nora Shalaway Carpenter

Book Series: Standalone

Rating: 5/5

Diversity: OCD rep! Own voice!

Publication Date: March 24, 2020

Genre: YA Contemporary

Recommended Age: 15+ (mental health, depression)

Publisher: Running Press Kids

Pages: 368

Amazon Link

Synopsis: Len is a loner teen photographer haunted by a past that’s stagnated her work and left her terrified she’s losing her mind. Sage is a high school volleyball star desperate to find a way around her sudden medical disqualification. Both girls need college scholarships. After a chance encounter, the two develop an unlikely friendship that enables them to begin facing their inner demons.

But both Len and Sage are keeping secrets that, left hidden, could cost them everything, maybe even their lives.

Set in the North Carolina mountains, this dynamic #ownvoices novel explores grief, mental health, and the transformative power of friendship.

Review: I really loved this one! It was poignant and heartbreaking all in the same. The book did well with the dual POVs and the character development was amazing. The world building was also done well and I applaud the author for making realistic characters, with flaws and all. Also, hats off to the amazing OCD rep!

The only issue I had with the book is that there were some overdramatic scenes and writing that I felt was a bit out of character. Other than that, this was a great book!

Verdict: A must read!

BOOK INFORMATION

The Edge of Anything

by Nora Shalaway Carpenter
Publisher: Running Press Teen
Release Date: 24th March, 2020

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary, Fiction, Mental Health

Synopsis:

Len is a loner teen photographer haunted by a past that’s stagnated her work and left her terrified she’s losing her mind. Sage is a high school volleyball star desperate to find a way around her sudden medical disqualification. Both girls need college scholarships. After a chance encounter, the two develop an unlikely friendship that enables them to begin facing their inner demons.

But both Len and Sage are keeping secrets that, left hidden, could cost them everything, maybe even their lives.

Set in the North Carolina mountains, this dynamic #ownvoices novel explores grief, mental health, and the transformative power of friendship.

BOOK LINKS

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40651796-the-edge-of-anything

Amazon: https://amzn.to/2sPKkrx

B&N: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-edge-of-anything-nora-shalaway-carpenter/1132821562?ean=9780762467587

Bookdepository: https://www.bookdepository.com/The-Edge-of-Anything-Nora-Shalaway-Carpenter/9780762467587

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/ebook/the-edge-of-anything-1

Google Books: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Nora_Shalaway_Carpenter_The_Edge_of_Anything?id=vqKnDwAAQBAJ&hl=en_US

author (10)

BOOK AUTHOR

Nora Shalaway Carpenter holds an MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults from Vermont College of Fine Arts. Before she wrote books, she served as associate editor of Wonderful West Virginia magazine and has been a Certified Yoga Teacher since 2012. Originally from rural West Virginia, she currently lives in Asheville, North Carolina with her husband, three young children, and one not-so-young dog. Learn more at www.noracarpenterwrites.com or follow her on Instagram @noracarpenterwrites and Twitter @norawritesbooks.

AUTHOR LINKS

Website: https://www.noracarpenterwrites.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17086511.Nora_Shalaway_Carpenter

Twitter: https://twitter.com/norawritesbooks

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/noracarpenterwrites/